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Theodore C. Blegen Award

The Forest History Society's (FHS) Theodore C. Blegen Award recognizes the best scholarship in forest and conservation history published in a journal other than Environmental History. FHS initiated the award in 1972.


Blegen Award Details

Named for Theodore C. Blegen, one of the founders of the Forest History Society, the Blegen award consists of a $500 cash award and a plaque. Editors of scholarly journals in the fields of forest and conservation history annually submit up to two articles from their publications for award consideration. An award subcommittee of the FHS board evaluates submissions and select the article that best exemplifies (1) contribution to new knowledge, (2) strength of scholarship, and (3) clarity and grace of presentation.


Recent Recipients

2014 Blegen Award
Turner, Nancy J., Douglas Deur, and Dana Lepofsky “Plant Management Systems of British Columbia’s First Peoples” BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly 179 (Autumn 2013): 107-133. Considers largers scale management techniques such as the use of fire to clear prairies and subalpine meadows as well as very focused actions, such as the pruning of individual
shrubs.
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(c) BC Studies

2013 Blegen Award
Rajala, Richard. "’Streams Being Ruined from a Salmon Producing Standpoint’: Clearcutting, Fish Habitat, and Forest Regulation in British Columbia, 1900-45” BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly 176 (Winter 2012/13):93-132. Analyzes the conflict between forestry and fisheries in British Columbia during the first half of the twentieth century. Looks at fish habitat degradation, attempts at regulatory action, and the work of local forest managers and fisheries officials.

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(c) BC Studies
2012 Blegen Award
Davis, Lynne. "Home or Global Treasure? Understanding Relationships Between the Heiltsuk Nation and Environmentalists." BC Studies: The British Columbia Quarterly 171 (Autumn 2011): 9-36. Looks at attempts to create a wilderness park in the Great Bear Rainforest area of British Columbia. Davis examines the tensions between environmentalists and the local indigenous Heiltsuk peoples who were directly impacted by the project.
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(c) BC Studies
2011 Blegen Award
Sutter, Paul S. "What Gullies Mean: Georgia's 'Little Grand Canyon' and Southern Environmental History." The Journal of Southern History 76, No. 3 (August 2010): 579-616. Examines Providence Canyon State Park in Georgia and its human-produced canyon of soil erosion resulting from poor agricultural practices during the 19th century. Looks at the preservation of this landscape of environmental degradation and explores the importance of soil to the study of southern environmental history.
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(c) Southern Historical Association
2010 Blegan Award
Swanson, Drew Addison. “Fighting over Fencing: Agricultural Reform and Antebellum Efforts to Close the Virginia Open Range.” Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 117, No. 2 (2009): 104-139. Swanson revisits the literature and offers a reinterpretation of the drive for enclosure in the antebellum South based on concerns about productivity and fertility, rather than class.
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Previous recipients